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  • Artists - Satirino
    Brancusi Trio Gourdjia Coppey Laul Fretwork Nachtmusique The Choir of Jesus College Cambridge Ensemble Clément Janequin London Haydn Quartet Takács Quartet Doric String Quartet Categories Copyright 2015 Satirino Sarl 5 Place Tanguy Prigent 29630 Saint Jean du Doigt France T

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  • Satirino records - Satirino
    Fantasy Dowland Tunes of Sad Despaire A Cleare Day Rameau Opera Ballet Transcriptions Bach Goldberg Variations Beethoven Complete Piano Concertos Beethoven Triple Piano Concerto N 3 Scarlatti Essercizi per gravicembalo Voyage Liszt Schubert Wagner Beethoven Piano Concertos Nos 1 5 Rachmaninov Moments musicaux Bach Italian Concerto Songs for Ariel Beethoven Piano Concertos Nos 2 4 Scarlatti Sonatas Bach Partitas Copyright 2015 Satirino Sarl 5 Place Tanguy Prigent 29630 Saint Jean

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    to consider with careful attention the slightly different qualities of each neighbouring key for detailed enjoyment of the colouristic aspect of the pieces We should remember the testament of the Polish polymath and composer Lorenz Mizler who claimed in 1754 that In tuning harpsichords Bach knew how to temper so exactly and correctly that all the keys sounded handsome and agreeable It is now generally agreed that there was no single Bach temperament and it is quite possible that he did not adhere to any of the prescribed methods Behind the interpretation of the pieces lies the question of the flux of styles Bach was by no means alone in subscribing to the fashion for fusion the 48 could be said to be fusion music par excellence Toccatas become dances dances become arias even Fugues can veer between the stile antico and the dance and sometimes end in fantasia like bravura In the later Baroque this fashion also deeply affected national styles we think particularly of Bach s identification of French suites and Italian concertos but in fact the 48 are perhaps the most extreme melting pot of the process of fusion into which the German Organ style and the archaic styles of Renaissance polyphony are also drawn in On another level it has long been recognised that both as example and accomplishment the Fugues advance the contrapuntal procedures with a variety and use of modulation which have no precursors models for future fugal composers or perhaps improvisers There remains the question of where Bach wrote the pieces and under what circumstances We have no reason to disbelieve Gerber when he claims that Bach at the time of the compilation of the first book did not compose at the keyboard What he writes next has led to speculation that Bach wrote them while he was held as a detainee for a month in prison in Weimar in 1717 He wrote his 48 in a place where ennui boredom and the absence of any kind of musical instrument forced him to resort to this pastime The idea that they were composed together is of course disproved by the earlier appearance of some of the Preludes in W F Bach s book and there are some even earlier versions but it remains possible that Bach did write some of the Preludes and Fugues of the first book in a single period of time and more possibly some from the second book Why did he embark upon a second This is a question posed by several Bach scholars Many pertinent answers have been suggested reminding us that Bach s craft was not elevated above those of his contemporaries as it is today After all he was a jobbing musician in a climate where positions could be terminated without notice competition was fierce and appointments were not made entirely without prejudice He was a difficult man an unforgiving taskmaster and hard negotiator And he had more and more children to educate and support Did he also perhaps use the volume to assuage criticism from Johann Adolph Scheibe among others that he wrote in a heavy outmoded style One of the noticeable innovations in Book II is in the number of Preludes written in binary form pieces in two parts with repeats Ten of these are found in this book as opposed to only one in the first This was Bach lightening up and responding to changes in fashion The principle of binary structure which had been largely confined to dance movements had now also affected character pieces as well as Sonatas In addition the second book has more Preludes which are based on a succession of musical ideas a characteristic development in musical form increasing towards the middle of the eighteenth century not least in the Sonatas of Domenico Scarlatti Perhaps these features explain why some commentators have found Book II to be more expressive As for the Fugues in Book II Mattheson was an active rival inviting Bach to comment on his fugues Bach may have done this in music rather than words in Book II augmenting his legacy to 48 The variety of types of Fugue some distinctly within the stile antico heritage others much lighter and closer to the Inventions is no less than in Book I but there is a noticeable increase in ingenuity particularly in the ways in which the fugal material is funneled through various keys A question much debated by interpreters is whether there was any intended relationship apart from the sharing of keys between the Preludes and Fugues Pianists have frequently based their interpretations on the assumption that there is often playing Fugues to fit the mood of the way they play the Preludes and perhaps vice versa frequently imposing romanticised concepts on them albeit sometimes very beautifully What is clear is that for Bach the Fugues were not academic exercises but just as much as the Preludes compositions aimed at developing the keyboard skill of communicating complex counterpoints through the fingers The various sources for Book II confirm a similar pattern There are earlier versions of many of the pieces thus it was in part a compilation rather than a new composition The composer s second wife Anna Magdalena is one of the copyists of the principal source for Book II now in the British Library in London and known as the London Autograph Enthusiasts can obtain a facsimile of this volume as well as that of Book I and Bach scholars have detailed the accretions in following copies including alternative passages different accidentals and added ornaments particularly by W F Bach Copying in those days was an important part of the learning process and many of his pupils seem to have made a copy Of particular interest is one made by his pupil Kirnberger which includes fingerings This recording without in any way claiming any particular authenticity whatever that means approaches from the standpoint of a deep relationship with the harpsichord itself and with

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    very modest the second is extraordinary with eleven crotchet beats contained within each of its bars Though divided by the original editors into 8 3 the peculiar rhythm of the first part of this long piece strikes the listener at once The final rhythmic quirk is to mix up duple and triple bars before the final cadence in chains of rising and falling thirds this is surely a deliberate compositional device Noticeable melodically are the chains of descending dissonances almost a recurrent pealing of bells One of the most imaginative of the keyboard writers in terms of technique Bull was highly innovative in more overtly secular music as is proved by the repeated notes at the end of The Duke of Brunswick s Alman almost Scarlattian By contrast the delightful miniature My Selfe is tuneful and memorable as is the piece preceding it in the collection the anonymous Can shee Bull was a composer of infinite variety William Tisdall also known as Tisdale dates unknown was clearly a friend of the Tregian family The Pavana Chromatica was not his prerogative but a style of keyboard piece shared by composers such as Sweelinck from the low countries John Bull wrote several challenging the tuning systems of the day Tisdall s is not extreme but delights in false relations where the major and minor third of the scale are heard in close proximity and a couple of times clash together The piece is modest in compass and virtuosity and suits the plangent sound of the virginals especially in its varied textures extending to some beautiful resonance at the top of the compass Known more as a madrigalist Morley is represented by only a dozen pieces in the Fitzwilliam book comprising virtually all the keyboard music known to be from his hand Fantasias were the most extended form used by the keyboard composers except for the occasional outsize set of variations Fantasias are essentially sectional with a sequence of new ideas for each part some contrapuntal some more chordal in conception Byrd was the composer of one of the most celebrated extended sets of variations his 22 variations on the theme known as Walsingham the Norfolk site of a celebrated Marian shrine even to this day In fact the Fitzwilliam begins with a scrawly Walsingham not by Byrd but by Bull a well loved tune Byrd s set varies it with much skill although it never becomes particularly virtuosic the variety is more of texture and harmonic subtlety It buries its triple time sections in middle variations returning to a more stable ending As well as writing more extended pieces Farnaby was good at the tuneful miniature style so well suited to the virginals His humour is the first of a sequence of five pieces in this vein The little quizzically titled anonymous Can shee is a Galliard and is a delightful unassuming piece as is the oddly spelt Corrãto which follows an import from the Hispanic peninsula Bull had this side as well his little Gigue Doctor Bull s my selfe like Farnaby s piece seems to be a slightly whimsical self portrait Farnaby s A Toye ends the sequence appropriately played on the child virginal alone a young gifted child could have delighted audiences with this piece Tisdall s Alman is treated similarly Fernando Richardson was a pupil of Tallis Only two pieces of his are included in the Fitzwilliam collection and they are both three section Pavans and Galliards with variations These are pieces whose essence is accumulating complexity Both the Pavan and Galliard are unusual in moving unpredictably between major and minor Tallis s Felix namque is an extended Fantasia a sectional setting of a chant particularly popular in England in the sixteenth century which alternates several of the textures common to the plainsong pieces in the book two part counterpoint chordal sections and sections with middle parts sketched in The piece is dated 1564 which marks it as one of the earlier pieces in the collection Using many cross rhythms it is in clearly delineated sections The text again popular in The Mulliner Book comes from the Common Mass of the Virgin Mary used on Saturdays from Epiphany until the Purification Missæ de Sancta Maria in Sabbato II Vultum Tuum FELIX NAMQUE es sacra Virgo María et omni laude digníssima quia ex te ortus est sol justítiæ Christus Deus noster FOR THOU art happy O sacred Virgin Mary and most worthy of all praise since out of thee hath arisen the sun of justice Christ our God The organ brings to this masterly piece a gravitas unexpected in this collection The inclusion of pieces in this vein again rather supports those stories about the Catholic motivation for the collection its essence is to combine explicitly religious pieces of immense nobility with a delight in contemporary dance keyboard miniatures and variations on popular tunes There are even some exercises for beginners Tregian s Keyboard Miscellany would be my title for this precious collection embracing such a variety of musical styles with pieces for players of all levels from some jewels for the beginner to magisterial pieces for the most accomplished of the keyboard players of the time Richard Langham Smith Instruments Organ of St Pierre s church in Nielles lès Ardres The organ St Pierre s church in Nielles lès Ardres is a remarkable example of 17th Century Flemish organ making The organ was built by Guillaume Van Belle and Jacques Van Eynde between 1696 and 1702 The magnificent Flemish style casing was made by Jean Piette It was originally built for the Sainte Aldegonde church in Saint Omer that was demolished during the French Revolution The organ was acquired in 1792 by the Parish of Nielles and installed in the church there by the organ maker Jean François Guilmant It was restored between 2002 and 2005 by Pierre Decourcelle The positive organ that disappeared during the transfer from St Omer during the Revolution was rebuilt in 2012 by

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    and Rhapsody could release them The second writer on gypsies was an English Minister of Religion George Borrow He lived with them in Spain and dispelled many of Grellmann s negative remarks His highly influential work was published in French in the 1840s just before Prosper Mérimée wrote his highly successful Carmen on which Bizet based his opera of 1875 The third study was an erudite book by Franz Liszt himself originally intended as a commentary on his Rhapsodies Hongroises which dated from the 1850s but vastly expanded and first published in 1859 It was several times reprinted and translated into English Although it confuses Gypsy music with Hungarian folk music which had become confused anyway and although much of it may have been ghosted by his lover of the time the Princess Caroline Sayn Wittgenstein it remains a treasure house of commentary on his capturing of the style hongrois in the Rhapsodies and in particular his dissection of the essential expressive elements of this style Liszt himself commented on his concept of the Rhapsodie By the word Rhapsodie we wanted to highlight its fantastically epic quality Each one of them is a part of a cycle of poetry remarkable for the unity of its inspiration which is above all national coming from one race and portraying their soul and their intimate feelings nowhere more expressed than in their own particular forms invented and practised by them alone Although it may sound facile as an assertion there are essentially two elements to the style hongrois slow and fast Liszt puts it like this The gypsy musician searches for an art form which expresses the most desolate sadness and the most passionate unstoppable joy The first style is known as hallgató meaning music to be listened to rather than danced to Hallgató is its highly expressive dependent on the meaning of the song being interpreted It is through the improvised embellishment with which Liszt s ideal musician imbues his song that its full expression is realised He explains The master who is most to be admired is he who enriches his theme with such a profusion of traits appoggiaturas tremolos scale arpeggios and diatonic or chromatic passages that under this luxuriant embroidery the primitive thought is no less visible than the material of his sleeve under his houppelande We are not so very far away from the profound song tradition of Southern Spain the Cante jondo deep song of the Andalusian gypsies Except that nobody sings As far as the dance styles are concerned the most typical variety became known as the verbunkos a term which originally designated a jolly type of music employed for luring young men into the military Liszt calls this second characteristic the Frischka in very quick time which suddenly or quickly gets faster A particular feature was the gradual acceleration of dances which began slowly we may think of the Gypsy Song Chanson bohème which opens the second act of Carmen Still surviving to this day is the celebrated Czardas which embodies both slow and quick sections several of Liszt s Fantasies follow this model Liszt best expressed its gypsy roots as The love of gaiety of dancing of music of women of drunkenness of orgies of reuniting these are their joys Liszt s Rhapsodies imitate Hungarian music in several ways n 11 is explicit in indicating that the whole opening section is to be quasi zimbalo in imitation of a cimbalom and marked Lento a capriccio it is clearly in the hesitant rubato style we have identified as hallgató The present recording demonstrates this uniquely Imitation of the instrumental idiosyncrasies of Hungarian and gypsy styles had been established long before Liszt but no one before him had extended them in such a virtuosic manner Ubiquitous in the society cafés of middle European cities the violinists of the gypsy bands entertained fashionable clients with ever increasing clever tricks most notably with fleeting scales bowings and arpeggios rising to unparalleled heights and also leaps between strings Haydn and Schubert among others had exploited this aspect in the latter case transferring the style to the piano but hardly as dexterously as Liszt does in the Pesther Carneval n 9 in which the various dances are separated by seemingly aimless filigree lines highlighting the pianist s delicacy of touch and timing Beginning rhapsodically in hallgató style it presents its first theme capriccio soon to be taken up in another typical style where the whole melody is sounded in parallel thirds a typical feature of cimbalom playing where neither the lower nor upper note of the third was considered predominant both were integral Other features of Cimbalom playing are used in the Introduction to n 7 the presentation of the melody with acciaccaturas the typical tremoli interspersed and a more pronounced exploitation of the melody in thirds formula The turning ornaments and cadential patterns are also formulaic Here gypsy dances the first is marked Allegro zingarese a gypsy Allegro are sandwiched between more expressive sections which use a harmonic technique also associated with the Hungarian Gypsy style the use of diminished chords based on minor scales with a sharpened fourth once again we may think of Carmen who has a motive on a similar scale to identify her as a gypsy Extraordinary virtuosity is also employed as so often in these pieces to ensure the piece concludes at maximum voltage The rendering of n s 14 10 and 11 introduces a sparing use of the folk instruments In n 14 in which a Funeral March is interspersed with a rendering of a Hungarian popular song The Crane Flies High in the Sky played on the violin and cimbalom The juxtaposition gives us a unique opportunity to hear the links between real Hungarian music and his 1850s Rhapsodies Liszt has already confirmed this in his book so here the folk instruments return to join in the last dance interspersed with a thoughtful passage of duetting between piano and cimbalom We may

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    your dittie speaketh of decending you must make your musicke descend The various theorists went increasingly deeply into the techniques of composition and particularly into the new world of harmony and rhythm the beginnings of Baroque expressivity Charles Butler looking back over the golden age of lute song in a 1636 treatise entitled The Principles of Musik in Singing and Setting writes of the expressive power of the descending semitone a device often used by Dowland Woords of effeminate lamentations sorrowful passions and complaints ar fitly exprest by the inordinate half notes he writes Morley had already identified other intervals in the 1597 treatise already mentioned Flat thirdes and flat sixes which of their nature are sweet he remarks while to express sighes you may vse the crotchet or minime rest The repetition of sorrowful words is also commonplace It should also not be forgotten that lute song composers mirrored the expressive devices of the vocal part in the lute accompaniments Such remarks are quintessentially of the turn of the sixteenth century where the song composers of for example the Florentine Camerata such composers as Jacopo Peri and Giulio Caccini not to mention Monteverdi were developing what Monteverdi called the Stile Rappresentativo where the words expressed emotions rather than described them A combination of influences from the French chanson with an interest in these new developments in Florentine music were important motivating forces in English music during the first part of the seventeenth century The popularity of rhetoric and a fashion for melancholy were also over arching particularly in the case of Dowland s Ayres Apart from the rhetorical devices advocated by Morley and Butler there was a more general principle at work in much of the poetry set by the lute song composers where the rhetorical proposition to be explored is encapsulated in the first words of the poem Examples of this procedure are common in Dowland On the present recording we may mention in this respect Go Cristal tears Sorrow come a variant on Sorrow stay Goe nightly cares Come heavy sleep not to mention the most famous Flow my tears Dowland s predilection for melancholic texts has often been remarked upon Semper Dowland semper dolens was the quip by which he is remembered Always Dowland always melancholy In the context of Elizabethan song this was by no means unique it was merely a musical expression of an emotional even philosophical concept already ingrained in English thought In 1586 Timothy Bright had published a Treatise of Melancholy and among other books dealing with Elizabethan melancholy Nicolas Breton had brought out a book of poems entitled Melancholic Humours in 1600 The major tome however was Robert Burton s The Anatomy of Melancholy published in 1621 but written earlier during the heyday of Dowland s melancholy Though published in Latin its English title promised the reader an explanation of What it is with all the kinds causes symptomes prognostickes severall cures of it For its author its causes had a

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    Only relatively recently a subsequent scholar found an example of Tregian s signature on a document in a library in Truro in Cornwall near the original family properties which had been seized as part of the punishment of the elder Francis Tregian It matched the Francis Tregian abbreviation often found in the Virginal Book But further questions remain how he could have had access to all the manuscript sources while imprisoned Another theory is that the manuscript while Tregian had a hand in it was actually put together by a scriptorium a team of copyists But here too questions may be raised What was its purpose And who paid for it So much for its origins How important is it as a source and what characterises its contents The first question can be simply answered in stressing its unparalleled richness For many of its pieces it is not the only source but there are notable exceptions especially in the case of the music by Giles Farnaby It is mostly of English music though it reflects the cross continental activities which so deeply affected the course of music at this time with some pieces by Italian composers some transcriptions known as keyboard intabulations based on Italian music both celebrated songs and madrigals and with some pieces by Flemish composers notably the Dutch keyboard master Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck After Mundy s meteorological Fantasia comes a tribute piece to John Dowland whose lute song Flow my tears and related consort pieces Lachrimae or Seven Teares enjoyed tremendous popularity at the turn of the sixteenth century Here we have a keyboard version by Byrd styled as a Pavana perfection itself in the way the tune is surrounded by expressive counterpoints which always have a clear direction and are beautifully crafted Sparing lute like chords accompany this type of texture is often referred to as the style brisé or broken style Occasionally Byrd takes our breath away with a higher register flourish of poignant beauty especially telling on the virginals Here the piece is paired with a Galliard in the same key from elsewhere in the book a typical pairing of what Morley called a kind of staid music ordained for grave dancing the Pavan while noting that after every pavan we usually set a galliard causing it to go by a measure which the learned call trochaicam rationem consisting of a long and a short stroke successively Peter Philips s intabulation of another popular hit Giulio Caccini s Amarilli mia bella could hardly be more contrasting Philips was himself most active as a madrigalist as well as being very cunning on the virginals The poem is typically Baroque in its physicality the poet offers Amaryllis an arrow to open his breast she will see written on his heart Amaryllis is my love Caccini s setting with its rising vocal line and intensifying harmonies mirrors the emotional crescendo of the poem Philips s keyboard setting follows suit with repeated full chords intensifying the imagery of

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    of flowers ever new Make everlasting garlands for you The following Airs close this scene in which Hebe invokes Pollux to indulge in a life of endless hedonism The first Track 10 in the extreme sharp key of E major associated with the pleasures of love has both grace and elaborate ornament while the second Track 11 is a touch more serious The first Gavotte with its unusual lilting rhythm comes from the end of the Prologue which ends with a formulaic mix of chorus dance and aria where Venus and Love have won over Mars the God of war Track 12 Given the frequency with which composers used opera to mirror contemporary political events this may be an allegorical reference to the peace of Vienna signed in 1736 to conclude the war of the Polish succession All and sundry are incited to revelry and mirth The hesitant Gavotte danced at first is followed by a second which is more angular This melts back into a texted version of the first Gavotte a favourite device of Rameau Short breathed phrases sigh in praise of earthly love Rekindle More brilliantly Peace and delight Be constant Fulfilling my desires Loves shall bring endless days of joy It can hardly be said that the final pair of Passepieds in Act IV Track 13 explore a new theme the music is very different but Castor slain at the beginning of the tragedy and now in the Elysian Fields the real Champs Elysées is even in death still seeking to dull his cares with endless pleasures The happy shades attend him once again in the hedonistic key of E major In the extraordinary first Passepied the beat is thrown all over the place in a prolonged series of hemiolas This is followed by an Air for a shade soloist and a second quicker Passepied The simple but beautiful melody of the Air is tinged with gentle diatonic dissonances and accompanied by a high bass part off the ground and contrasting with the earthly and earthy drive of the surrounding dances The shades tell of the pleasures of this male oriented utopia in a series of cooing arias As many loves as there are flowers As many lovers as there are beautiful girls And the beauties are eternally faithful While the suitors are always successful And there are always new flowers to pick Terrible storms ensue but Castor and his brother Pollux are finally granted immortality Rameau s Acte de ballet Pygmalion was first given in 1748 a time when there was a particular vogue for the single act opera ballet Its Overture loses nothing of Rameau s abundant fertility of characterisation in Balbastre s witty transcription The themes of both sections of the overture Track 14 have a repeated note motive to represent Pygmalion chipping away at the statue he is sculpting of his beloved Balbastre at times skilfully reduces the texture to the bare minimum required to give the illusion of the harmony and at others demands that the player pounds the instrument with full chords at the extremities of the keyboard He is particularly clever at exploiting the resonant bass with a device where the left hand rotates rather than hammers giving the harpsichord a chance to speak more clearly at a higher speed And as Pygmalion having chipped away thoughtfully at first suddenly goes into overdrive chiselling at breakneck speed and entirely relentlessly he collaborates with Rameau in humorous mischief This is followed by one of Rameau s masterstrokes both musically and in terms of stagecraft Pygmalion teaches the statue to dance in a continuous ordre in which the dances are not only strongly contrasted but also slip unexpectedly into one another Track 15 The slow air which opens the sequence has deliciously lingering suspensions wooing us into reverie only to be gently awakened by the notes coulées of the Gavotte gracieuse itself to be swept away before it has cadenced by a dovetailed Minuet high in the register After this ringing the changes Rameau hesitates before the next movement rather than sweeping on This time we have a Gavotte gaie replete with echo effects Changes of mode and key are skilfully used further to vary this compressed suite of dances After the minor mode Chaconne the trochaic rhythms of the Loure noble and poised as well as the Passepied which follows are in C major a clever device because it enables Rameau to slip easily into F minor the dark key of the chant lugubre for the Sarabande unusual for its imitation between treble and bass A change back to the major is easily achieved for the rollicking Tambourin which ends this unique dancing lesson Then comes a Gigue Track 16 and the Pantomime subtitled an Air Gai Track 17 which is a fine of example of Rameau the gifted tunesmith with an inexhaustible ability to write memorable dance tunes always with unpredictable hesitations and unusually captivating turns of phrase It occurs as the crowd enters dancing after the Graces have taught the statue to dance The Contredanse is the final movement of this Acte de ballet Track 18 While one recurrent theme of French Baroque Opera was the idealisation of hedonism another was the representation of the exotic No opera typified this aspect of French spectacle more than Les Indes Galantes a title notoriously difficult to translate but signifying foreign lands and their customs particularly as regards lovemaking What Rameau s Opéra Ballet lacks in story line it makes up for in the variety of its exotic locations which range from Peru Turkey red Indian North America and Persia to locations nearer home Spain Italy and Poland A long as we all make love the issues that divide us will somehow miraculously disappear Once again Hebe is the mistress of ceremonies Increasingly throughout the eighteenth and throughout the nineteenth century exotic spectacles delighted in the reinforcement of cultural stereotypes Without going as far as Berlioz who portrayed the Nubian slaves

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